News ID: 341999
Publish Date: 02 April 2012 - 05:37
Activist:
Navideshahed: An American peace activist says the US-led sanctions regime against Iran over its nuclear energy program is “not just arrogant but also a criminal act."

“It’s a terrible position to say that the United states government can dictate policies to other nations regarding how and who they can do business with, [and] who they cannot do business with,”? Ellie Ommani said in an exclusive interview on Sunday.

The activist also blamed the United States “behaving so arrogantly on the economic front against Iran”? for the wave of protests against economic adversities sweeping across Europe.

The measures by the United States and its allies “which they hope to be economically and politically punitive toward Iran”? are actually interfering with the normal market prices and the way that material circulate at a time when the global economy is still in recession, Ommani said.

“It’s causing more harm than it’s helping,”? she added.

On Friday, US President Barack Obama gave the green light for fresh sanctions against foreign banks and other financial institutions by or through which Iran’s oil is purchased. The move would allow the US to take measures against foreign banks that deal with Iranian crude.

New sanctions aim to force major importers of Iranian crude, namely China, South Korea, India, Japan and the European Union, to "significantly reduce" oil imports from Iran or face being frozen out of the US financial system.

The White House claims there is enough oil in the market to fill the gap caused by a reduction in oil exports from Iran.

"There is a sufficient supply of petroleum and petroleum products from countries other than Iran to permit a significant reduction in the volume of petroleum and petroleum products purchased from Iran by or through foreign financial institutions," Obama said.

Despite US assurances, there are concerns about disruptions in oil supply. The sanctions have already led to a surge in global oil prices. Rising gasoline prices have become a major issue in the US presidential election campaign.

“They (US and allies) want to always blame that the problems are because of someone else or some other factor but it’s their own behavior which is going to haunt them and is going to worsen I think what they call the global recovery,”? Ommani concluded.

The End
Source: PressTV

“It’s a terrible position to say that the United states government can dictate policies to other nations regarding how and who they can do business with, [and] who they cannot do business with,”? Ellie Ommani said in an exclusive interview on Sunday. The activist also blamed the United States “behaving so arrogantly on the economic front against Iran”? for the wave of protests against economic adversities sweeping across Europe. The measures by the United States and its allies “which they hope to be economically and politically punitive toward Iran”? are actually interfering with the normal market prices and the way that material circulate at a time when the global economy is still in recession, Ommani said. “It’s causing more harm than it’s helping,”? she added. On Friday, US President Barack Obama gave the green light for fresh sanctions against foreign banks and other financial institutions by or through which Iran’s oil is purchased. The move would allow the US to take measures against foreign banks that deal with Iranian crude. New sanctions aim to force major importers of Iranian crude, namely China, South Korea, India, Japan and the European Union, to "significantly reduce" oil imports from Iran or face being frozen out of the US financial system. The White House claims there is enough oil in the market to fill the gap caused by a reduction in oil exports from Iran. "There is a sufficient supply of petroleum and petroleum products from countries other than Iran to permit a significant reduction in the volume of petroleum and petroleum products purchased from Iran by or through foreign financial institutions," Obama said. Despite US assurances, there are concerns about disruptions in oil supply. The sanctions have already led to a surge in global oil prices. Rising gasoline prices have become a major issue in the US presidential election campaign. “They (US and allies) want to always blame that the problems are because of someone else or some other factor but it’s their own behavior which is going to haunt them and is going to worsen I think what they call the global recovery,”? Ommani concluded. The End Source: PressTV
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